Let My People Go - Albert Luthuli (Paperback)

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Product Details

Barcode
9780795708404
Department
Books
Released
18 May 2018
Content Source
South African
Supply Source
South Africa

Book

Author
Albert Luthuli
Binding
Paperback
Publisher
Kwela Books
Language
English
Number of Pages
304
Dimensions
198 x 130mm

Summary

This book is as much Albert Luthuli's extraordinary story as that of the ANC, which he led for 15 years. He gives an account of the repression and resistance that were to shape the South African political landscape forever: the Defiance Campaign, which marked the first mass challenge to apartheid, drafting the Freedom Charter, the Treason Trial, and the Alexandra bus boycott. This book bears witness to Luthuli's unfailing humility, perseverance, and passionate commitment to his values.

Classification

General Subject
Current & World Affairs
BISAC Subject 1
Political Science / Political Process / Political Advocacy
BISAC Subject 4
Political Science / Political Process / General
BISAC Subject 5
Political Science / Political Freedom & Security / Human Rights
BIC Classification 1
Political activism
BIC Classification 2
Political leaders & leadership
BIC Classification 3
Political oppression & persecution
BIC Classification 4
African history
BIC Classification 5
Autobiography: historical, political & military

Inside Flap

Chief Albert John Mvumbi Luthuli, Africa‚Äôs first Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, was President-General of the African National Congress (ANC) from December 1952 until his death in 1967. Chief Luthuli was the most widely known and respected African leader of his era. A latecomer to politics, the Chief was 54 when he assumed the leadership of the ANC.

Author Bio

Chief Albert John Mvumbi Luthuli, Africa's first Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, was President-General of the African National Congress (ANC) from December 1952 until his death in 1967. Chief Luthuli was the most widely known and respected African leader of his era. A latecomer to politics, the Chief was 54 when he assumed the leadership of the ANC.