Harry Potter and the Cursed Child - Parts I & II - J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany (Hardcover)

Special Rehearsal Edition Script

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Description

Based on an original new story by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany, a new play by Jack Thorne, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is the eighth story in the Harry Potter series and the first official Harry Potter story to be presented on stage. The play will receive its world premiere in London's West End on 30th July 2016.

It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn't much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband, and father of three schoolage children.

While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn th

Product Details

Barcode
9780751565355
Department
Books
Released
31 Jul 2016
Supply Source
UK

Book

Authors
J. K. Rowling
J.K. Rowling
Jack Thorne
John Tiffany
Subtitle
The Official Script Book of the Original West End Production
Binding
Hardback
Publisher
Little, Brown Book Group
Language
English
Number of Pages
352
Dimensions
234 x 153 x 153mm (594g)

Summary

Based on an original new story by J.K. Rowling, John Tiffany and Jack Thorne, a new play by Jack Thorne, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is the eighth story in the Harry Potter series and the first official Harry Potter story to be presented on stage. The play will receive its world premiere in London's West End on 30th July 2016.

It was always difficult being Harry Potter and it isn't much easier now that he is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband, and father of three school-age children.

While Harry grapples with a past that refuses to stay where it belongs, his youngest son Albus must struggle with the weight of a family legacy he never wanted. As past and present fuse ominously, both father and son learn the uncomfortable truth: sometimes, darkness comes from unexpected places.

Juvenile Fiction

General Subject
Children's Fiction
BISAC Subject 1
Juvenile Fiction / Action & Adventure / General
BISAC Subject 2
Juvenile Fiction / Fantasy & Magic
BISAC Subject 3
Fiction / General
BISAC Subject 4
Fiction / Action & Adventure
BISAC Subject 5
Fiction / Fantasy / General
BIC Classification 1
Plays, playscripts
BIC Classification 2
Fantasy & magical realism (Children's / Teenage)
Library Subject 1
Wizards - Drama
Library Subject 2
Fantasy drama
Dewey Classification
822.914
Readership
General (US: Trade)

Author Bio

J .K. ROWLING
J.K. Rowling is the author of the seven Harry Potter novels, which have sold over 450 million copies and have been translated into 79 languages, and three companion books originally published for charity. She is also the author of The Casual Vacancy, a novel for adults published in 2012, and, under the pseudonym of Robert Galbraith, is the author of the Cormoran Strike crime series. J.K. Rowling is making her screenwriting debut and is a producer on the film Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, a further extension of the Wizarding World, due for release in November 2016.

JOHN TIFFANY
John Tiffany directed Once, for which he was the recipient of multiple awards both in the West End and on Broadway. As Associate Director of the Royal Court, his work includes The Twits, Hope and The Pass. He was the director of Let the Right One In for the National Theatre of Scotland, which transferred to the Royal Court, West End and St Ann's Warehouse. His other work for the National Theatre of Scotland includes Macbeth (also Broadway), Enquirer, The Missing, Peter Pan, The House of Bernarda Alba, Transform Caithness: Hunter, Be Near Me, Nobody Will Ever Forgive Us, The Bacchae, Black Watch, for which he won the Olivier and Critics' Circle Best Director Awards, Elizabeth Gordon Quinn and Home: Glasgow. Other recent credits include The Glass Menagerie at ART and on Broadway and The Ambassador at BAM. Tiffany was Associate Director of the National Theatre of Scotland from 2005 to 2012, and was a Radcliffe Fellow at Harvard University in the 2010-2011 academic year.

JACK THORNE
Jack Thorne writes for theatre, film, television and radio. His theatre credits include Hope and Let the Right One In, both directed by John Tiffany, The Solid Life of Sugar Water for the Graeae Theatre Company and the National Theatre, Bunny for the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, Stacy for the Trafalgar Studios, and 2nd May 1997 and When You Cure Me for the Bush. His adaptations include The Physicists for the Donmar Warehouse and Stuart: A Life Backwards for HighTide. On film his credits include War Book, A Long Way Down and The Scouting Book for Boys. For television his credits include The Last Panthers, Don't Take My Baby, This Is England, The Fades, Glue, Cast-Offs and National Treasure. He won BAFTAs in 2016 for Best Mini-Series (This Is England '90) and Best Single Drama (Don't Take My Baby), and in 2012 for Best Drama Series (The Fades) and Best Mini-Series (This Is England '88).

Customer Reviews

Sure to delight fans of the series

Reviewed by on

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, a new play by Jack Thorne based on an original new story by JK Rowling, John Tiffany and Jack Thorne, starts with the epilogue of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Harry, Ginny, Ron and Hermione sending their own children off to Hogwarts. Harry’s youngest son, Albus Severus, is headed to Hogwarts for his first year and he is afraid of being sorted into Slytherin House. This is indeed what happens. Albus has great difficulty mastering spells in school and is soon dubbed “The Slytherin Squib”. This, and the constant comparisons to his famous father, leads to a lot of doubt and confusion for young Albus who becomes a distant, troubled young man who finds an unexpected friend and ally in fellow Slytherin, Scorpius Malfoy, the son of Draco Malfoy.

Albus and Harry have a very strained relationship which becomes only more strained as the years pass. Albus, mistakenly believing that Harry does not care at all for the blood spilt in his name, takes it upon his own inexperienced shoulders to right at least one wrong - Albus decides to break into the Ministry of Magic, steal the time-turner now in Hermione's possession, return to the Tri-Wizard Tournament and prevent Cedrick Diggory's death. Yeah... going back in time to alter events... what could possibly go wrong?

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child follows Albus Potter and Scorpius Malfoy as they navigate past and present, creating more wrongs than they fix as they tamper with the past and the butterfly effect changes everything in their present. As Albus and Scorpius create all kinds of trouble messing with the past, Harry starts having very disturbing nightmares about his troubled son and his scar starts to hurt for the first time since Voldemort's death - could it mean what we all fear it means? I would have appreciated more time with our core trio, but this time around they are more supporting characters as the story focuses on Albus. My favourite character is Scorpius Malfoy, much to my surprise! I found him to be very complex and incredibly funny – I actually think, given the chance, he would have gotten along famously with the Weasley twins (oh, Fred). The plot is very well written and keeps you on the edge of your seat. After so many years away, it is great fun visiting Hogwarts again and catching up with beloved characters.

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is, of course, released not in the form of a novel but as the script of the play. It obviously reads very differently than the Potter novels, but it is quite easy to get into. My only criticism would be that as reader I am not quite as immersed in the Potter universe as I am when reading the novels which have much greater, vivid descriptions – but as this is essentially a play meant to be seen more than a script meant to be read, this is not a fair criticism at the end of the day. I am, however, not London-based and doubt very much that I will ever get to see the play performed in Pretoria, South Africa, so settle for the script I must – at least until a film version I desperately yearn for. This story would make an excellent movie, though given the complexity of the plot and elements of time travel, a film version seems highly unlikely. I also very much doubt that Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson and Rupert Grint could be persuaded to return for another Potter movie, but I think audiences would forgive a change in casting since their characters are 19-22 years older than during the events of the Battle of Hogwarts. I, for one, would forgive a change of casting if it meant I got to see this story play out on the silver screen... however, nobody – and I mean nobody – could replace Alan Rickman as Professor Snape…

All in all Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is great entertainment and sure to be a hit with all fans of the series. As a film version seems highly unlikely, be sure to get yourself a ticket to the play (I would if I could!) or get your hands on a copy of the script - you will not be disappointed.

A good addition to the Harry Potter universe

Reviewed by on

If you ignore some plot holes

*spoiler* time travel * end spoiler*

The play is quite good, a must for any Potter fan. Although I imagine it would be much better performed live as it should be intended as opposed to the books format here.

An enjoyable read that should be read for the nostalgia and not for the expectation of being a fully fleshed out story.

Reviewed by on

Review originally appears on my book blog: The Book Fairy's Haven (http://bookfairyhaven.blogspot.co.za/2016/08/book-review-harry-potter-and-cursed.html)

I’ve seen a lot of criticism about this not being an actual book, which is rather ridiculous considering that this was originally written and adapted for stage.

To me, this book actually reads like a series of Throwback Thursday moments simply because of the fact that for most parts of the play, we explore scenarios set in the same landscape, but alternative universe in terms of time – and as such, we get to play witness to interactions with some of our old familiar favourites.

Of course, considering that this is the script of a play, a lot of the moments in the book often get lost in translation because we are only provided with snapshots of moments instead of fully developed and fleshed out scenes.

It’s enough to give us an overview of the characters and scenarios, but personally, it did leave me wanting more.

The best bits of the play-to-book script is the friendship that is explored between Scorpius and Albus (they're the most adorable duo ever) and the complex relationship that both of them have with their fathers (so many daddy issues yo).

To be frank, I’m not even sure why the relationship between the boys were made to be one that is simply a close friendship, considering all the subtext and UST (unresolved sexual tension). In fact, I’ve seen many people describe this as the Scorbus (Albus and Scorpius) fan fiction they’ve dreamed of and I’m inclined to agree.

To echo what I’ve said to a friend who asked about Albus and Scorpius: the subtext is so non-subtext that this book could just as well have paired the two together from the onset.

In terms of plot, there were several moments that left me scratching my head and one huge moment that I was certainly not expecting (I’m still ruminating on this aspect even though it’s been almost two weeks since I’ve read the book. I also find it hard to believe that a certain character is capable of feeling any form of feeling that isn’t tied to murderous intent, but I guess that is what Jo was banking on, so well played, Jo. Well played).

However, despite the fact that I feel like so many things were left unanswered and unaddressed (which I’m mostly excusing because ya know, SCRIPT and not novel (as mentioned above), Harry Potter and the Cursed Child ended up being a fun and fantastical read and one whose play I'm definitely still interested in seeing.

Read it because it’s fun, but don’t expect epic character arc, development and intricate plots and sub-plots.

Great continuation of an epic fantasy.

Reviewed by on

A great read, if not slightly disappointing, as you would imagine, the grittiness and imagery that Rowling could bring to the pages is lacking. However, having read all 7 previously, I can imagine the scenes perfectly! Definitely a must have for any Potter fan.

A good addition to the series

Reviewed by on

A surprisingly quick read despite being in play format. Took me back to the days of reading Shakespeare for school, only much more entertaining and easier to keep track of. The story has lovely and unexpected twists and turns, with a fantastic display of all actions, no matter how small, have consequences.