Autobiography of Mark Twain, Volume 1 - Mark Twain (Hardcover)

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Description

"I've struck it!" Mark Twain wrote in a 1904 letter to a friend. "And I will give it away - to you. You will never know how much enjoyment you have lost until you get to dictating your autobiography." This title tells his story.

Product Details

Barcode
9780520267190
Department
Books
Released
1 Nov 2010
Supply Source
UK

Book

Annotation

  • Twain wrote his life story with instructions that it remain unpublished for 100 years so when published, he would be “dead, and unaware” and therefore free to speak his mind. One hundred years after his death, UC Press offers for the first time his uncensored autobiography in its entirety. "Twain dictated much of this book—now it is a book at last—from a big rumpled bed. Reading it is a bit like climbing in there with him."—Roy Blount, Jr.
  • In the first complete and uncensored edition of his autobiography, one of America's foremost authors and humorists relates experiences lived, people encountered, places visited, and judgments rendered throughout his lifetime.

Summary

  • "Mark Twain dictated much of this book--now it is a book at last--from a big rumpled bed. Reading it is a bit like climbing in there with him."--Roy Blount, Jr.

    "To say that the editors have done an extremely good job is a little like saying the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel does a good job of keeping the rain off the Pope's head. It is true but it doesn't give even a whiff of the grandeur of the thing."--Robert D. Richardson, author of Emerson: The Mind on Fire

    "Mark Twain, always so blithely ahead of his time, has just outdone himself: he's brought us an Autobiography from beyond the grave: a hundred-year-old relic that yet manages to accomplish something new. It anticipates the Cubism just taking form in Samuel Clemens's last years, by exploding the confines of orderliness, sequence, the dutiful march of this-then-that. In so doing, it gives us not simply Mark Twain's life--that is the prosaic work of biographers--but the ways in which he thought of his life: in all the fragmented recollection, distraction, creation, revision and dreaming that make up the true, divinely jumbled devices we all use to recapture experience and feeling. If this prodigious and prodigal pastiche were a machine, it would be the Paige typesetter--except that it works."--Ron Powers, author of Mark Twain: A Life

Non-Fiction

General Subject
Literary Criticism
BISAC Subject 1
Literary Criticism / American / General
BISAC Subject 2
Fiction / Literary
BISAC Subject 3
Literary Criticism / American / General
BIC Classification 1
Literary studies: c 1800 to c 1900
BIC Classification 2
Literary studies: fiction, novelists & prose writers
BIC Classification 3
Autobiography: literary
Library Subject 1
Authors, American; 19th century; Biography.
Library Subject 2
Authors, American - 19th century
Dewey Classification
818/.4/0924

Inside Flap

"Mark Twain dictated much of this book—now it is a book at last—from a big rumpled bed. Reading it is a bit like climbing in there with him."—Roy Blount, Jr.

"To say that the editors have done an extremely good job is a little like saying the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel does a good job of keeping the rain off the Pope's head. It is true but it doesn't give even a whiff of the grandeur of the thing."—Robert D. Richardson, author of Emerson: The Mind on Fire

"Mark Twain, always so blithely ahead of his time, has just outdone himself: he's brought us an Autobiography from beyond the grave: a hundred-year-old relic that yet manages to accomplish something new. It anticipates the Cubism just taking form in Samuel Clemens's last years, by exploding the confines of orderliness, sequence, the dutiful march of this-then-that. In so doing, it gives us not simply Mark Twain's life—that is the prosaic work of biographers—but the ways in which he thought of his life: in all the fragmented recollection, distraction, creation, revision and dreaming that make up the true, divinely jumbled devices we all use to recapture experience and feeling. If this prodigious and prodigal pastiche were a machine, it would be the Paige typesetter—except that it works."—Ron Powers, author of Mark Twain: A Life

Author Bio

Harriet Elinor Smith is an editor at the Mark Twain Project, which is housed within the Mark Twain Papers, the world's largest archive of primary materials by this major American writer. Under the direction of General Editor Robert H. Hirst, the Project's editors are producing the first comprehensive edition of all of Mark Twain's writings.