The Uncensored Picture of Dorian Gray - Oscar Wilde (Paperback)

A Reader's Edition

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Description

Over 120 years after Oscar Wilde submitted The Picture of Dorian Gray for publication, the uncensored version of his novel appears here for the first time in a paperback edition. This volume restores material, including instances of graphic homosexual content, removed by the novel's first editor, who feared it would be "offensive" to Victorians.

Product Details

Barcode
9780674066311
Department
Books
Released
13 Aug 2012
Supply Source
USA

Book

Authors
Oscar Wilde
Nicholas Frankel (Editor)
Subtitle
A Reader's Edition
Binding
Paperback
Publisher
Harvard Univ Pr
Edition
GLD
Language
English
Number of Pages
260
Dimensions
216 x 146 x 19mm (347g)

Annotation

The uncensored version of the tale of Dorian Gray, a vain hedonist who indulges in every sin he can think of while a painting too repetitive ages instead of him.

Summary

  • <p>More than 120 years after Oscar Wilde submitted <i>The Picture of Dorian Gray</i> for publication in <i>Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine</i>, the uncensored version of his novel appears here for the first time in a paperback edition. This volume restores all of the material removed by the novel’s first editor.<br><br>Upon receipt of the typescript, Wilde’s editor panicked at what he saw. Contained within its pages was material he feared readers would find “offensive”—especially instances of graphic homosexual content. He proceeded to go through the typescript with his pencil, cleaning it up until he made it “acceptable to the most fastidious taste.” Wilde did not see these changes until his novel appeared in print. Wilde’s editor’s concern was well placed. Even in its redacted form, the novel caused public outcry. The British press condemned it as “vulgar,” “unclean,” “poisonous,” “discreditable,” and “a sham.” When Wilde later enlarged the novel for publication in book form, he responded to his critics by further toning down its “immoral” elements.<br><br>Wilde famously said that <i>The Picture of Dorian Gray</i> “contains much of me”: Basil Hallward is “what I think I am,” Lord Henry “what the world thinks me,” and “Dorian what I would like to be—in other ages, perhaps.” Wilde’s comment suggests a backward glance to a Greek or Dorian Age, but also a forward-looking view to a more permissive time than his own repressive Victorian era. By implication, Wilde would have preferred we read today the uncensored version of his novel.</p>

Non-Fiction

General Subject
Literature/Classics
BISAC Subject 1
Fiction / Classics
BIC Classification 1
Literary studies: general
Library Subject 1
Appearance (Philosophy); Fiction.
Library Subject 2
Conduct of life; Fiction.
Library Subject 3
Appearance (Philosophy)
Academic Subject 1
Irish Novel And Short Story
Dewey Classification
823/.8

Author Bio

Nicholas Frankel is Associate Professor of English at Virginia Commonwealth University.