A Stranger in the Village - Farah J. Griffin (Paperback)

Two Centuries of African-American Travel Writing

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Product Details

Barcode
9780807071212
Department
Books
Released
1 May 1999
Supply Source
USA

Book

Authors
Farah J. Griffin (Editor)
Cheryl J. Fish (Editor)
Subtitle
Two Centuries of African-American Travel Writing
Binding
Paperback
Publisher
Beacon Pr
Language
English
Number of Pages
384
Dimensions
235 x 159 x 25mm (476g)

Annotation

A compilation of accounts of foreign travel by African Americans includes the works of James Baldwin, Angela Davis, and Langston Hughes

Summary

  • Dispatches, diaries, memoirs, and letters by African-American travelers in search of home, justice, and adventure-from the Wild West to Australia.

Non-Fiction

General Subject
Multicultural
BISAC Subject 1
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / African American Studies
BISAC Subject 2
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / African American Studies
BISAC Subject 3
Literary Criticism / American / African American
BIC Classification 1
Literary studies: general
BIC Classification 2
Black & Asian studies
BIC Classification 3
Anthologies (non-poetry)
BIC Classification 4
Travel writing
Library Subject 1
African Americans; Travel; History; Sources.
Library Subject 2
Travelers' writings, American.
Academic Subject 1
African American Prose
Academic Subject 2
Description And Travel
Dewey Classification
910/.8996073

Author Bio

Farah J. Griffin, author of Who Set You Flowin'?, is associate professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania. Cheryl J. Fish is assistant professor of English at Borough of Manhattan Community College, CUNY.

Review Quotes

[A Stranger in the Village] will explode any lingering notions that travel writing is a white writer's game.-Bob Sipchen, Los Angeles Times "[A] remarkable anthology." -Victoria Valentine, Emerge

"An intelligent, authoritative collection for anyone interested in travel writing, memoirs, or African-American history." -Cond Nast Traveler

"[James] Baldwin's astute observation that 'this world is white no longer, and it will never be white again, ' could not be more obvious in this collection." -The Miami Herald

"A thinking person's travel anthology." -Chicago Sun-Times