WD Blue Desktop Internal Hard Drive - 1TB SATA 6GB/s 7200rpm

WD10EZEX

Dispatched in 1 to 3 working days
Price
720
RRP
R 759
(-5%)
(14 user ratings)
1 review received. View

Summary

Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200rpm SATA 6Gb/s 64MB. Hard drive interface: Serial ATA III, Hard drive capacity: 1000 GB, Hard drive size: 8.89 cm (3.5"). Power consumption (standby): 1.2W, Power consumption (read): 6.8W, Power consumption (write): 6.8W. Width: 14.7 cm, Height: 2.54 cm, Depth: 10.16 cm. Number of products included: 1 pcs

Description

WD Caviar Blue hard drives are available with either SATA or PATA interface in a variety of cache sizes with a multitude of available features to deliver rock solid performance and ultra-cool and quiet operation perfect for family and business computing.

Product Details

Barcode
WD10EZEX
Department
Electronics
Released
9 Jun 2012
Product Group
Internal Hard Drives
Manufacturer
Brand
Western Digital
Series
Blue
Product Link
View Product
Warranty
2 Years
Weight & Dimensions
Width
147 mm
Height
25.4 mm
Depth
101.6 mm
Weight
440 g
Hard drive
Certification
CE, RoHS
Data transfer rate
6 Gbit/s
Drive device, buffer size
64 MB
Hard drive capacity
1000 GB
Hard drive interface
Serial ATA III
Hard drive size
3.5 "
Hard drive speed
7200 RPM
SMART technology
Yes
Start/stop cycles
300000
Operational conditions
Operating relative humidity (H-H)
10 - 90 %
Operating temperature (T-T)
0 - 60 °C
Storage relative humidity (H-H)
5 - 90 %
Storage temperature (T-T)
-40 - 60 °C
Other features
Internal
Y
Number of products included
1 pcs
Power
Power consumption (idle)
6.1 W
Power consumption (read)
6.8 W
Power consumption (standby)
1.2 W
Power consumption (write)
6.8 W
System requirements
Linux operating systems supported
Y
Mac compatibility
Y
Mac operating systems supported
Y
Windows operating systems supported
Y
Supply Source
South Africa

Customer Reviews

Always Test Your New Hard Drives!!!

Reviewed by on

Whenever you get a new hard drive, run a bad block scan, preferably the default 4 pass write/read test. If impatient, run for 2 passes, or control-c when its done checking the 2nd/3rd pass. Then check the S.M.A.R.T. data to see if there are any: Reallocated Sector Count*, Reallocation Count*, Current Pending Sector Count*, Uncorrectable Sector Count*, Write Error Rate, 0 to small amount of read error rate (some fields and values vary across drives and manufactures, but the sector/reallocated fields should always be 0). Once you start getting bad sectors, replace the drive ASAP.

To test the drive:

Download and boot up a Linux distro. This process will take many hours to days to complete depending on the drive speed, drive size, USB vs SATA, chipset and computer, etc.

Open a terminal (or not already at a shell), then type:

sudo badblocks -wsv -b 4096 (or 512 if its an old drive..type 'fdisk -l' to show if its 512 or 4096 sector format) /dev/sdX (X is your particular device) , example: sudo badblocks -wsv -b 4096 /dev/sda. There is an optional -c which specifics the amount of blocks at a time to process, it may or may not increase the speed. If you use it try -c 131072 or -c 65536, or -c 32768, or -c 16384. Might come in handy if testing multiple drives at once.

Try running it for 10-20 seconds with a -c [xxxxxx] or leaving it out, and ctrl-c after 20 seconds--do that for 3-4 different block speeds to determine which one progresses the furthest @ 20 seconds (or whatever interval you count to). For me, leaving the -c option out worked best.

What you are doing is exercising the drive and writing all: 00000000s, 11111111s, 10101010s, and 01010101s patterns across the entire space of the drive, and verifying that it correctly wrote every single bit that writes to the platter. Usually (not always) if a drive is bad, it will show up sooner than later, so you are giving the new drive a solid workout to determine if the drive is defective or not.

These are mid-level desktop drives with only a 2-year warranty. Mid-Level HDDs used to have a 3 year (sometimes 5) year warranty. Yeah, it's not a bad idea to get into the mindset that when you buy a new HDD, don't expect to be able to use if for a few days until after you test it! It's only your data . . .