Psycho (DVD)

1998

Dispatched in 7 to 10 working days
Price
26
RRP
R 59.99
(-57%)
No reviews yet.

Description

Marion Crane steals a lot of cash from a man whom her boss is in business with. On the way to see her boyfriend, she stops off by an old motel, run by the odd Norman Bates. She is murdered in the shower. Her sister, boyfriend, and a private investigator try to find out where she is, while we learn more about Norman Bates.

Product Details

Barcode
5050582379136
Department
Movies & TV
Released
1 Jan 2006
Type
Movies
Format
DVD
Genre
Horror
Region
Region 2
Year
1998
Language
English
Studio
Universal Pictures
Runtime
104 min
Age Restriction
PG
Supply Source
South Africa

Movie

Title
Psycho
Release Year
1998
Running Time
104 min
Language
English
Categories
Horror/Suspense / Crime / Horror Movies / Psychodrama / Psychos / Remake / Theatrical Release / Thriller
Synopsis
A remake of director Alfred Hitchcock's 1960 thriller about a young woman, who, while on the run after stealing $40,000 from her boss, is brutally murdered in the shower of a motel she is staying in one night. As police investigate her disappearance, we learn more about the motel's psychotic owner, Norman Bates. Director Gus Van Zant's film is a shot-for-shot remake of the original.
Cast & Crew
Director
Gus Van Sant
Star
Chad Everett / Robert Forster / Philip Baker Hall / Anne Haney / Anne Heche / Rance Howard / James LeGros / William H. Macy / Julianne Moore / Viggo Mortensen / Vince Vaughn
Composer
Bernard Herrmann
Producer
Brian Grazer
Director of Photography
Christopher Doyle
Editor
Amy E. Duddleston
Costume Designer
Beatrix Aruna Pasztor
Story
Robert Bloch
Screenplay
Joseph Stefano
Movie Critics
Entertainment Weekly
"...What could be juicier, or more appropriate, than this post-modern PSYCHO?....A fascinating stunt..." -- Rating: B
Owen Gleiberman (18 Dec 1998, pp.49-50)
Sight and Sound
"...A work of 'metacinematic' research. By remaking PSYCHO, the film-makers have managed to replay formally notions of transgression and difference that manifested themselves in Hitchcock's original as themes and subtexts..."
Gavin Smith (1 Jan 1970, p.36-51)