Lost Highway (DVD)

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Description

Saxophonist Fred Madison (Bill Pullman) receives a series of videos showing the exterior, then the interior, of the house he shares with his wife Renee (Patricia Arquette). Then, after meeting a mysterious man at a party, he receives another tape showing him with Renee's dismembered corpse. Found guilty of her murder, Fred is put in prison, where he inexplicably transforms into another person - mechanic Pete Dayton (Balthazar Getty) - who is set free and goes to work for Mr Eddy (Robert Loggia), a gangster who is dating Alice (Arquette again), Renee's blonde doppelgänger. Directed by David Lynch.

Product Details

Barcode
5050582888072
Department
Movies & TV
Released
4 Jun 2012
Type
Movies
Format
DVD
Genre
Thriller
Region
Region 2
Language
English
Extras
  • Interactive Menus
Runtime
128 min
Age Restriction
18
Supply Source
UK

Movie

Title
Lost Highway
Release Year
1997
Language
English
Categories
Dramas / Blackmail / Disturbing / Film Noir / Infidelity / Love Triangle / Murder / Mystery / Psychodrama / Surreal / Switching Roles / Theatrical Release / Thriller
Synopsis
Director David Lynch ups the weird ante with this "psychological fugue." Fred Madison (Bill Pullman) is a jazz saxophonist who is married to the beautiful Renee (a brown-haired Patricia Arquette). After receiving menacing videotapes taken from inside their home, the couple begin to worry. Fred's fear is compounded when he meets a mysterious man (Robert Blake) at a flamboyant party. Fred wakes up to discover that Renee has been murdered, and Fred is convicted of the crime. Trouble is, he doesn't remember anything from that night. Sitting in a jail cell, he undergoes a miraculous transformation, waking up as Pete Dayton (Balthazar Getty), a young mechanic. When Pete meets a dangerous client's sexy girlfriend, Alice Wakefield (a blonde Arquette), a passionate affair blossoms that threatens to expose Pete.
In typical Lynch fashion, he makes no effort whatsoever to explain his film or justify its bizarre occurrences, resulting in an enigmatic thriller that feels like the viewer has unknowingly walked into another person's dream. The screenplay adheres to many universal film noir conventions, but Lynch and co-screenwriter Barry Gifford's psychological angle gives them a freedom to do anything that they so desire (a concept they giddily embrace). For fans of surreal, visually arresting cinema, Lynch delivers once again.
Notes
Theatrical release: February 21, 1997.

Lynch introduces the LOST HIGHWAY screenplay with this statement: "A 21st-century noir horror film. A graphic investigation into parallel identity crises. A world where time is dangerously out of control. A terrifying ride down the lost highway."

LOST HIGHWAY is Lynch and Barry Gifford's first effort writing an original screenplay together, although the pair has collaborated before. (Lynch adapted Gifford's WILD AT HEART and also filmed two Gifford teleplays for the HBO series HOTEL ROOM.)
Fred and Renee's house is actually one of Lynch's Los Angeles homes. Lynch also designed the furniture.
Cast & Crew
Director
David Lynch
Star
Patricia Arquette / Giovanni Ribisi / Robert Blake / Gary Busey / Lucy Butler / Scott Coffey / Balthazar Getty / Natasha Gregson Wagner / Jack Kehler / Robert Loggia / Michael Massee / Jack Nance / Richard Pryor / Bill Pullman / Henry Rollins
Screenwriter
Barry Gifford / David Lynch
Composer
Angelo Badalamenti
Producer
Deepak Nayar / Tom Sternberg / Mary Sweeney
Director of Photography
Peter Deming
Editor
Mary Sweeney
Production Designer
Patricia Norris
Costume Designer
Patricia Norris
Sound Effects Editor
Bill Brown
Movie Critics
Entertainment Weekly
"...Lynch displays his peerless gift for creeping us out with a minimum of means -- the sheer anticipation of horror..."
Owen Gleiberman (21 Feb 1997, p.103-4)
Los Angeles Times
"...Beautifully made....LOST HIGHWAY is best at creating a sense of unease....Lynch has put together some thoroughly spooky situations..."
Kenneth Turan (21 Feb 1997, p.F10)
New York Times
"...Coolly ominous....[The film] constructs an intricate puzzle out of dream logic, lurid eroticism, violence, shifting identities and fierce intimations of doom..."
Janet Maslin (21 Feb 1997, p.C1)
Sight and Sound
"...A truly terrifying picture....It works on the evocation of unease through subtle sounds and blaring doom metal..."
Kim Newman (1 Sep 1997, p.48-9)
Uncut
3 stars out of 5 -- "[N]ightmare visionary David Lynch slipped the moorings of conventional narrative altogether..."
Stephen Dalton (1 Mar 2006, p.132)
USA Today
"...Titillating....Amusing Lynch trademarks abound..."
Mike Clark (21 Feb 1997, p.4D)