Kamikaze Girls (Blu-ray)

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Description

2004 Japanese comedy directed by Tetsuya Nakashima. Momoko Ryugasaki (Kyoko Fukada) is a bit of an oddball 17-year-old, who is fascinated by life in 18th century Versailles. She wears her version of what she thinks people wore there at that time and dreams of being able to get away from her boring life. Momoko's father (Hiroyuki Miyasako) makes his living selling counterfeit brand-name clothes, but when he gets on the wrong side of some bad people, he has to flee to the countryside. Momoko decides to escape from her boredom and to make some money by selling the last of her father's dodgy stock. In doing this, she meets up with biker chick, Ichigo (Anna Tsuchiya). So begins a strange friendship and a colourful series of adventures as the odd couple lurch into situations both comic and dangerous.

Product Details

Barcode
5060148530239
Department
Movies & TV
Released
8 Feb 2010
Type
Movies
Format
Blu-ray
Genre
Foreign Language
Sub-genre
Comedy
Region
Region B
Language
Japanese
Studio
Third Window
Extras
  • Interactive Menus
  • Enhanced WS tv
  • Bonus Footage
  • Trailers
  • Interviews: Tetsuya Nakashima (Director), Anna Tsuchiya, Kyoko Fukada
  • Making Of Documentary: 'The Birth of Unicorn Ryuji'
  • Bonus Tracks: Anna Tsuchiya Music Video
Runtime
103 min
Age Restriction
12
Supply Source
UK

Movie

Title
Kamikaze Girls
Release Year
2005
Running Time
102 min
Language
English
Alternate Title
Shimotsuma monogatari
Categories
Foreign Films / Japanese / Friends / Friendships / Pop Stars / Teenage Girls / Theatrical Release
Synopsis
Based on the hit Japanese novel SHIMOTSUMA STORY by Novala Takemoto, KAMIKAZE GIRLS is a charming, unique, and very funny film. Pop star Kyoko Fukada stars as Momoko, a 17-year-old girl so obsessed with everything rococo that she wears old-fashioned frilly white clothing and carries a parasol. After her mother (Ryoko Shinohara) leaves and her would-be yakuza father (Hiroyuki Miyasako) gets kicked out of the big city for selling the wrong kind of designer knock-offs, Momoko and her dad move to the country, living with Momoko's somewhat offbeat grandmother (Kirin Kiki). Desperate for money, Momoko starts selling the remainder of her father's counterfeit clothing, but her only customer is a tough-talking young biker chick, Ichigo (Anna Tsuchiya), who belongs to an all-girl gang. Against all probability, the two very different teenagers become best friends, even though neither will admit it. And when Ichigo faces serious danger, Momoko must decide whether she can save the day. Writer-director Tetsuya Nakashima infuses the delightful KAMIKAZE GIRLS with fast-paced scenes, goofy flashbacks, playful sets, bright colors, and an endearing and infectious sense of fun in every shot.
Notes
Theatrical Release: September 9, 2005 (NY)
Cast & Crew
Director
Tetsuya Nakashima
Star
Sadao Abe / Yoshiyoshi Arakawa / Kyoko Fukada / Hirotaro Honda / Kirin Kiki / Eiko Koike / Hiroyuki Miyasako / Katsuhisa Namase / Yoshinori Okada / Ryoko Shinohara / Anna Tsuchiya / Shin Yazawa
Screenwriter
Tetsuya Nakashima
Source Writer
Novala Takemoto / Author: Novala Takemoto
Producer
Satoru Ogura
Director of Photography
Shoichi Atou
Movie Critics
Entertainment Weekly
"[A] hyperstylized, supercute female-bonding odyssey....[T]he cultural divide acts as a saccharine filter, and KAMIKAZE, a cult hit in Japan, becomes a mesmerizing lesson in otherness."
Scott Brown (15 Sep 2005, p.62)
New York Times
"Like Enid and Rebecca in GHOST WORLD, these two lonely girls travel through a world of their own creation, manufactured from the detritus of pop culture and pronounced alienation....[The film is] a nice primer to Japanese pop culture."
Manohla Dargis (9 Sep 2005, p.E14)
Sight and Sound
"KAMIKAZE GIRLS is something of a primer to Japanese pop culture....The film is full of the usual visual flourishes one expects from manga-influenced Japanese pop-films."
Roger Clarke (1 Aug 2008, p.67)